SOME TIPS FOR LISTENING TO THE AUDIO FILES
After You've Gone

 

NOTE:  THIS PAGE IS SOMEWHAT DATED, MADE OBSOLETE BY THE EVER CHANGING COMPUTER OPERATING SYSTEMS, BROWSERS AND MEDIA PLAYER SOFTWARE.   IT'S DIFFICULT TO KEEP UP TO DATE WITH ALL THIS  TRIVIAL TECHNICAL TWADDLE WHEN YOU ARE JUST AN OLD GUY WORKING AT HOME ON HIS OWN COMPUTER.  THE MAIN REASON I'VE LEFT THE PAGE UP IS BECAUSE OF THE WONDERFUL WARTIME POSTERS.   YOU MAY STILL FIND SOME HELPFUL NUGGETS, BUT I DOUBT YOU WILL NEED TO READ THROUGH IT ALL IN ORDER TO ENJOY THE MUSIC ON THE WWII WEEKEND WEB.

First of all, you don't have to read any of this.  If you are a fairly competent computer user, feel free to skip this page, go back, just click on the music and broadcast links, and wing it!  If not, or if you already tried it and it's SNAFU, read on and we'll try to get you up and listening.  You may want to go ahead and read about the Easter Eggs, though.

Don't be a dope!  Get the straight dope!

The background music and vintage radio broadcast recordings on the WW2WE site are either MP3 or WAVE format files.   These will typically begin streaming* and play automatically using your Windows Media Player (which comes with Microsoft Internet Explorer and Windows), or another audio player (more on those later).  Once the Windows Media Player comes up and begins to play you can minimize it, and let it play in the background while you continue to read or browse the WW2WE pages....

 

If you use Netscape Navigator as your browser and/or use RealPlayer or Quicktime to play your audio files, right-click on the music link and select "Open Link in New Window" (Netscape)...

The same thing goes if you have MSIE, but use RealPlayer, Quicktime, or another audio player.  Right-click and select  "Open in New Window" ...

If you have a different audio player than one of these that does not use the main browser window to play, you can just proceed as you normally do.

* Streaming is a technique for transferring data so that it can be processed as a steady and continuous stream.  With streaming, your browser or plug-in can start playing the audio (or video) before the entire file has been transmitted.  It requires a media playing program on your system, such as Windows Media Player, RealPlayer, or Quicktime.

The down side is that if you have a slow, dial-up connection, it will take some time for the data buffer to build up enough for it to start playing.  But it will still be faster than downloading the whole file to play it.  You may experience stuttering or pauses, or both in the audio.  Also, because the stream download is sharing your bandwidth, it may slow down the loading of pages and pictures.  But don't sweat the small stuff, sailor!  Even on a Model T dial-up, you may be able to play some of these files without a hitch.  In particular this applies to the old radio broadcast and music wave (.wav) files because these are low rate, 10kb/sec, 8 Bit Mono, 11.025 kHz files.  (Don't worry, you don't have to know what any of that means! - unless you are a radio operator, in which case there will be a quiz!)   Just try the song or broadcast and if it won't play well for you, abort the mission. 

But no sweat, G.I., if you would still like to hear it, where there's a will, there's a way.  You will need to download the file from our server and it will then play on your system, rather than stream.  Here's how...

For MS Internet Explorer: Right-click with your mouse on the music link and select "Save Target As"...

This will open up a new Window called "Save As"...

Select where you want the file saved. Then when it is finished downloading you can double-click on the saved file to play it with your default audio player. 

For Netscape, it's just the same, except that the menu selection will be called "Save Link Target As..."...

Even if you have a pretty fast connection, you may have trouble streaming a few of the MP3 audios, as these are larger, high-quality stereo files.  You may want to go ahead and download them.   Rather than try to label all of the links with a bunch of information about file sizes, streaming rates, and all that stuff, we would prefer you just click on the link and see how it goes.  Be your own judge, as all systems differ and so do people's patience levels.

Those lucky souls with broadband connections should have no problems streaming and browsing at the same time. 

Eager as you may be to hear the great sounds, it's a good idea for all users to allow the page and its graphics to finish loading before hitting the audio links, though.  Otherwise you can end up with missing thumbnail pictures, links, and other goodies until the buffering of the streaming audio is finished.

We like the Windows Media Player just fine, and you can get the latest Version 11 from Microsoft, here.  It will not put other, unwanted stuff on your system.

But, if you prefer, you can get free versions of RealPlayer here, and Quicktime here.  Both offer more capable versions for a price.

 

"Easter Egg Audios"  

In various spots around the Photo Galleries are some hidden, "Audio Easter Eggs".   Top secret stuff!  Shhhhh.  Loose lips sink ships! 

 

But since you have "the need to know" I can tell you this much:  There is at least one hidden egg in each of the galleries and you will find them "underneath" some of the photo thumbnails.  They range from period songs, news broadcasts, speeches, live comedy routines and even some wartime radio ads.

Small ones will play right away, especially if yours is a fast system.  Longer pieces will take some time while the stream buffer builds up.  But you'll know when you've found an egg, because the page title at the top of your browser will read "TALLYHO!".   You may also see the "Downloading data, etc" legend and the little progress bar at the bottom of your browser in the Status Bar.  If you see that, you'll know there is a file loading.   You'll get an idea of how big a file, meaning how long a recording it is, by that progress bar.  You can choose to wait for it and listen, or just continue on with your browsing by hitting your Back button, which will halt the download.  Unlike the "unclassified" audio links, these Easter Egg Audios will only play while the particular picture window is open.

One caution:  Because these Easter Egg files do not use your Media Player to play, it's possible to have two things playing at the same time; one being the background audio, if you have chosen to play it, and the other the egg.  To avoid this, you can either wait until the background music finishes before opening pictures, or turn off one or the other audio files.  To stop the background sound, bring up the Media Player and hit the pause or stop buttons...

 

To stop the Easter Egg, either click on the little red X icon at the top of your browser, hit your Escape key (Esc)...

...or click the back button to close the picture along with the egg sound. 

That's all folks.  Have fun and enjoy the sounds of a bygone era.